Food for Fashion: a Flavoursome Curation

Words: Cynthia Ko

The future of fashion is looking incredibly flavoursome as entrepreneurs from all over the world turn to food and organic materials for inspiration. We’re not talking about meat dresses here, but elegant solutions that make use of materials we often take for granted.

Admittedly, the best way forward in fashion is still to re-use what we already own as long as possible (see: Revolutionising Fashion: a New Way of Producing and Consuming), but if all else fails, turning food waste into something wearable will bring some sustainable spice into your wardrobe. Today’s menuoffers you a wide range of options.

The apple [ăp′əl] - A fruity sphere that sheds its skin across the leather landscape.

From applelicious dresses during the Dutch Design Week to fabulous Italian pouches made from “AppleSkin”... These are not just fruity edibles that keep the doctor away. Nowadays, we fight against animal cruelty by involving apples in our fashion diet.

Apple Skin is a leather-like textile made from… you guessed it: apple skin. Dried apple remnants are milled to a fine powder, then mixed with polyurethane as a binding agent. Unfortunately, it is not entirely plastic-free (yet), but hopefully the future will bring us recycled or alternative binding agents.

This fruity leather has found its way into several fashion items already. Italian shoemaker Womsh sells fancy kicks made from Apple Skin and recycled PET bottles, striking a balance between fashion and the environment. Elsewhere in Europe, Swiss brand Happy Genie takes you into the luxury market with its floral handbags made from apples. With its interchangeable straps and designs, it’s perfect for any occasion. Other change-makers in the bag department include minimalist brand Samara and Nuuwaï (Best Vegan Brand of 2019).

The pineapple [pīn′ăp′əl] - A sweet, tropical treat with a sustainable hairdo.

Pluck off some leaves from a fresh pineapple, and you’ve got yourself the main ingredient for Piñatex (a.k.a. Pineapple Leather). Just like Apple Skin, Piñatex takes a stance for responsible fashion production. The great difference is that pineapple leaves are often a byproduct that’s discarded by consumers anyway. Filipino tradition already figured out how to make use of this waste. Its “Barong Tagalog” is a traditional, formal shirt for Filipino men, traditionally made from banana leaves or pineapple leaves.

Nowadays, Piñatex takes a modern, crinkly aesthetic that’s reminiscent of real leather. You’d barely spot the difference in Jo-Anne Vernay’s elegant heels or Hugo Boss’ classy sneakers. In need of a bag instead? Feeling Felt and Maravillas got you covered! For a bit of bling in your wardrobe, there’s even metallic version of Piñatex that’s often found in clutches and wallets. Check out #MadeFromPiñatex to see how designers are plucking their pineapples. In the words of Mercer Amsterdam: “It’s not all socks and sandals, vegan never looked this cool”.

Soy [soi] - A bean that feeds your skin with silky softness.

Who doesn’t love a soft, warm sweater during winter times? Sadly, the cashmere industry doesn’t have a great reputation with its contribution to Mongolian desertification and animal abuse. Enter: a revolutionary Vegetable Cashmere made from soybean residue during tofu production.

Vegetable Cashmere is an equally soft alternative that’s 100% biodegradable and great for both winters and summers. It even works for workouts! The material is great for sportswear as well since it’s breathable, anti-bacterial, UV-resistant and lightweight. KD New York (a producer of clothes worn by celebrities such as Jennifer Lopez and Beyoncé) will soon be the first to release their Vegetable Cashmere Collection which has received world-wide kickstarter support equalling 54,238 US Dollars.

Algae [ăl′gə] - Seaborne greens, floating to the fashion surface.

The sea is full of riches that don’t just go well with sushi. Spanish fashion brand Ecoalf has been experimenting with algae for sneaker soles since 2018. In an interview with DeZeen, the brand claims that "Algae gives us the most flexible-performing foam. Also, removing it allows clean water to circulate properly, supports plant and animal life, and eliminates the need for non-renewable oils”. Remaining sneaker parts are usually made from recycled plastics; their current collection recovered 500 tons of marine waste from the ocean.

Other algae-inspired experiments include Charlotte McCurdy’s rain jacket made from algae-plastic and Alga-Life’s Bio-Tech-Textile that claims to use zero chemicals, fertilizers or CO2. This latter textile also uses 2,100 L less water than your regular T-shirt, so these seaborne vegetables are even greener than they look like.

Gum [gŭm] - A sticky substance that’s going full-circle, into your shoes.

Just for the fun of it, we’re steering away from the fruits and vegetables here. Do you know that feeling when you’re just dwelling around in a big city, and suddenly a sticky piece of gum won’t let go of your shoes? Back in 2018, Gumdrop decided to take the chewing gum to your feet with its Gum-tec Gumshoe, in collaboration with iAmsterdam. The sole is made of gum litter, and even displays a map of Amsterdam and its gum litter to raise awareness.

Sadly, it doesn’t seem for sale anymore and putting your feet in chewing gum might feel slightly awkward.It does create some food for thought (pun intended) on what’s in store for the future of fashion. Who knows what edible textiles will be released in a few years from now?

Shop our conscious edit:

Conscious fashion essentials: vegan leather

Conscious beauty: vegan

Food for Fashion: a Flavoursome Curation

Words: Cynthia Ko

The future of fashion is looking incredibly flavoursome as entrepreneurs from all over the world turn to food and organic materials for inspiration. We’re not talking about meat dresses here, but elegant solutions that make use of materials we often take for granted.

Admittedly, the best way forward in fashion is still to re-use what we already own as long as possible (see: Revolutionising Fashion: a New Way of Producing and Consuming), but if all else fails, turning food waste into something wearable will bring some sustainable spice into your wardrobe. Today’s menuoffers you a wide range of options.

The apple [ăp′əl] - A fruity sphere that sheds its skin across the leather landscape.

From applelicious dresses during the Dutch Design Week to fabulous Italian pouches made from “AppleSkin”... These are not just fruity edibles that keep the doctor away. Nowadays, we fight against animal cruelty by involving apples in our fashion diet.

Apple Skin is a leather-like textile made from… you guessed it: apple skin. Dried apple remnants are milled to a fine powder, then mixed with polyurethane as a binding agent. Unfortunately, it is not entirely plastic-free (yet), but hopefully the future will bring us recycled or alternative binding agents.

This fruity leather has found its way into several fashion items already. Italian shoemaker Womsh sells fancy kicks made from Apple Skin and recycled PET bottles, striking a balance between fashion and the environment. Elsewhere in Europe, Swiss brand Happy Genie takes you into the luxury market with its floral handbags made from apples. With its interchangeable straps and designs, it’s perfect for any occasion. Other change-makers in the bag department include minimalist brand Samara and Nuuwaï (Best Vegan Brand of 2019).

The pineapple [pīn′ăp′əl] - A sweet, tropical treat with a sustainable hairdo.

Pluck off some leaves from a fresh pineapple, and you’ve got yourself the main ingredient for Piñatex (a.k.a. Pineapple Leather). Just like Apple Skin, Piñatex takes a stance for responsible fashion production. The great difference is that pineapple leaves are often a byproduct that’s discarded by consumers anyway. Filipino tradition already figured out how to make use of this waste. Its “Barong Tagalog” is a traditional, formal shirt for Filipino men, traditionally made from banana leaves or pineapple leaves.

Nowadays, Piñatex takes a modern, crinkly aesthetic that’s reminiscent of real leather. You’d barely spot the difference in Jo-Anne Vernay’s elegant heels or Hugo Boss’ classy sneakers. In need of a bag instead? Feeling Felt and Maravillas got you covered! For a bit of bling in your wardrobe, there’s even metallic version of Piñatex that’s often found in clutches and wallets. Check out #MadeFromPiñatex to see how designers are plucking their pineapples. In the words of Mercer Amsterdam: “It’s not all socks and sandals, vegan never looked this cool”.

Soy [soi] - A bean that feeds your skin with silky softness.

Who doesn’t love a soft, warm sweater during winter times? Sadly, the cashmere industry doesn’t have a great reputation with its contribution to Mongolian desertification and animal abuse. Enter: a revolutionary Vegetable Cashmere made from soybean residue during tofu production.

Vegetable Cashmere is an equally soft alternative that’s 100% biodegradable and great for both winters and summers. It even works for workouts! The material is great for sportswear as well since it’s breathable, anti-bacterial, UV-resistant and lightweight. KD New York (a producer of clothes worn by celebrities such as Jennifer Lopez and Beyoncé) will soon be the first to release their Vegetable Cashmere Collection which has received world-wide kickstarter support equalling 54,238 US Dollars.

Algae [ăl′gə] - Seaborne greens, floating to the fashion surface.

The sea is full of riches that don’t just go well with sushi. Spanish fashion brand Ecoalf has been experimenting with algae for sneaker soles since 2018. In an interview with DeZeen, the brand claims that "Algae gives us the most flexible-performing foam. Also, removing it allows clean water to circulate properly, supports plant and animal life, and eliminates the need for non-renewable oils”. Remaining sneaker parts are usually made from recycled plastics; their current collection recovered 500 tons of marine waste from the ocean.

Other algae-inspired experiments include Charlotte McCurdy’s rain jacket made from algae-plastic and Alga-Life’s Bio-Tech-Textile that claims to use zero chemicals, fertilizers or CO2. This latter textile also uses 2,100 L less water than your regular T-shirt, so these seaborne vegetables are even greener than they look like.

Gum [gŭm] - A sticky substance that’s going full-circle, into your shoes.

Just for the fun of it, we’re steering away from the fruits and vegetables here. Do you know that feeling when you’re just dwelling around in a big city, and suddenly a sticky piece of gum won’t let go of your shoes? Back in 2018, Gumdrop decided to take the chewing gum to your feet with its Gum-tec Gumshoe, in collaboration with iAmsterdam. The sole is made of gum litter, and even displays a map of Amsterdam and its gum litter to raise awareness.

Sadly, it doesn’t seem for sale anymore and putting your feet in chewing gum might feel slightly awkward.It does create some food for thought (pun intended) on what’s in store for the future of fashion. Who knows what edible textiles will be released in a few years from now?

Shop our conscious edit:

Conscious fashion essentials: vegan leather

Conscious beauty: vegan

Food for Fashion: a Flavoursome Curation

Words: Cynthia Ko

The future of fashion is looking incredibly flavoursome as entrepreneurs from all over the world turn to food and organic materials for inspiration. We’re not talking about meat dresses here, but elegant solutions that make use of materials we often take for granted.

Admittedly, the best way forward in fashion is still to re-use what we already own as long as possible (see: Revolutionising Fashion: a New Way of Producing and Consuming), but if all else fails, turning food waste into something wearable will bring some sustainable spice into your wardrobe. Today’s menuoffers you a wide range of options.

The apple [ăp′əl] - A fruity sphere that sheds its skin across the leather landscape.

From applelicious dresses during the Dutch Design Week to fabulous Italian pouches made from “AppleSkin”... These are not just fruity edibles that keep the doctor away. Nowadays, we fight against animal cruelty by involving apples in our fashion diet.

Apple Skin is a leather-like textile made from… you guessed it: apple skin. Dried apple remnants are milled to a fine powder, then mixed with polyurethane as a binding agent. Unfortunately, it is not entirely plastic-free (yet), but hopefully the future will bring us recycled or alternative binding agents.

This fruity leather has found its way into several fashion items already. Italian shoemaker Womsh sells fancy kicks made from Apple Skin and recycled PET bottles, striking a balance between fashion and the environment. Elsewhere in Europe, Swiss brand Happy Genie takes you into the luxury market with its floral handbags made from apples. With its interchangeable straps and designs, it’s perfect for any occasion. Other change-makers in the bag department include minimalist brand Samara and Nuuwaï (Best Vegan Brand of 2019).

The pineapple [pīn′ăp′əl] - A sweet, tropical treat with a sustainable hairdo.

Pluck off some leaves from a fresh pineapple, and you’ve got yourself the main ingredient for Piñatex (a.k.a. Pineapple Leather). Just like Apple Skin, Piñatex takes a stance for responsible fashion production. The great difference is that pineapple leaves are often a byproduct that’s discarded by consumers anyway. Filipino tradition already figured out how to make use of this waste. Its “Barong Tagalog” is a traditional, formal shirt for Filipino men, traditionally made from banana leaves or pineapple leaves.

Nowadays, Piñatex takes a modern, crinkly aesthetic that’s reminiscent of real leather. You’d barely spot the difference in Jo-Anne Vernay’s elegant heels or Hugo Boss’ classy sneakers. In need of a bag instead? Feeling Felt and Maravillas got you covered! For a bit of bling in your wardrobe, there’s even metallic version of Piñatex that’s often found in clutches and wallets. Check out #MadeFromPiñatex to see how designers are plucking their pineapples. In the words of Mercer Amsterdam: “It’s not all socks and sandals, vegan never looked this cool”.

Soy [soi] - A bean that feeds your skin with silky softness.

Who doesn’t love a soft, warm sweater during winter times? Sadly, the cashmere industry doesn’t have a great reputation with its contribution to Mongolian desertification and animal abuse. Enter: a revolutionary Vegetable Cashmere made from soybean residue during tofu production.

Vegetable Cashmere is an equally soft alternative that’s 100% biodegradable and great for both winters and summers. It even works for workouts! The material is great for sportswear as well since it’s breathable, anti-bacterial, UV-resistant and lightweight. KD New York (a producer of clothes worn by celebrities such as Jennifer Lopez and Beyoncé) will soon be the first to release their Vegetable Cashmere Collection which has received world-wide kickstarter support equalling 54,238 US Dollars.

Algae [ăl′gə] - Seaborne greens, floating to the fashion surface.

The sea is full of riches that don’t just go well with sushi. Spanish fashion brand Ecoalf has been experimenting with algae for sneaker soles since 2018. In an interview with DeZeen, the brand claims that "Algae gives us the most flexible-performing foam. Also, removing it allows clean water to circulate properly, supports plant and animal life, and eliminates the need for non-renewable oils”. Remaining sneaker parts are usually made from recycled plastics; their current collection recovered 500 tons of marine waste from the ocean.

Other algae-inspired experiments include Charlotte McCurdy’s rain jacket made from algae-plastic and Alga-Life’s Bio-Tech-Textile that claims to use zero chemicals, fertilizers or CO2. This latter textile also uses 2,100 L less water than your regular T-shirt, so these seaborne vegetables are even greener than they look like.

Gum [gŭm] - A sticky substance that’s going full-circle, into your shoes.

Just for the fun of it, we’re steering away from the fruits and vegetables here. Do you know that feeling when you’re just dwelling around in a big city, and suddenly a sticky piece of gum won’t let go of your shoes? Back in 2018, Gumdrop decided to take the chewing gum to your feet with its Gum-tec Gumshoe, in collaboration with iAmsterdam. The sole is made of gum litter, and even displays a map of Amsterdam and its gum litter to raise awareness.

Sadly, it doesn’t seem for sale anymore and putting your feet in chewing gum might feel slightly awkward.It does create some food for thought (pun intended) on what’s in store for the future of fashion. Who knows what edible textiles will be released in a few years from now?

Shop our conscious edit:

Conscious fashion essentials: vegan leather

Conscious beauty: vegan

Gum [gŭm] - A sticky substance that’s going full-circle, into your shoes.

Just for the fun of it, we’re steering away from the fruits and vegetables here. Do you know that feeling when you’re just dwelling around in a big city, and suddenly a sticky piece of gum won’t let go of your shoes? Back in 2018, Gumdrop decided to take the chewing gum to your feet with its Gum-tec Gumshoe, in collaboration with iAmsterdam. The sole is made of gum litter, and even displays a map of Amsterdam and its gum litter to raise awareness.

Sadly, it doesn’t seem for sale anymore and putting your feet in chewing gum might feel slightly awkward.It does create some food for thought (pun intended) on what’s in store for the future of fashion. Who knows what edible textiles will be released in a few years from now?

Shop our conscious edit:

Conscious fashion essentials: vegan leather

Conscious beauty: vegan

Gum [gŭm] - A sticky substance that’s going full-circle, into your shoes.

Just for the fun of it, we’re steering away from the fruits and vegetables here. Do you know that feeling when you’re just dwelling around in a big city, and suddenly a sticky piece of gum won’t let go of your shoes? Back in 2018, Gumdrop decided to take the chewing gum to your feet with its Gum-tec Gumshoe, in collaboration with iAmsterdam. The sole is made of gum litter, and even displays a map of Amsterdam and its gum litter to raise awareness.

Sadly, it doesn’t seem for sale anymore and putting your feet in chewing gum might feel slightly awkward.It does create some food for thought (pun intended) on what’s in store for the future of fashion. Who knows what edible textiles will be released in a few years from now?

Shop our conscious edit:

Conscious fashion essentials: vegan leather

Conscious beauty: vegan

Gum [gŭm] - A sticky substance that’s going full-circle, into your shoes.

Just for the fun of it, we’re steering away from the fruits and vegetables here. Do you know that feeling when you’re just dwelling around in a big city, and suddenly a sticky piece of gum won’t let go of your shoes? Back in 2018, Gumdrop decided to take the chewing gum to your feet with its Gum-tec Gumshoe, in collaboration with iAmsterdam. The sole is made of gum litter, and even displays a map of Amsterdam and its gum litter to raise awareness.

Sadly, it doesn’t seem for sale anymore and putting your feet in chewing gum might feel slightly awkward.It does create some food for thought (pun intended) on what’s in store for the future of fashion. Who knows what edible textiles will be released in a few years from now?

Shop our conscious edit:

Conscious fashion essentials: vegan leather

Conscious beauty: vegan

Gum [gŭm] - A sticky substance that’s going full-circle, into your shoes.

Just for the fun of it, we’re steering away from the fruits and vegetables here. Do you know that feeling when you’re just dwelling around in a big city, and suddenly a sticky piece of gum won’t let go of your shoes? Back in 2018, Gumdrop decided to take the chewing gum to your feet with its Gum-tec Gumshoe, in collaboration with iAmsterdam. The sole is made of gum litter, and even displays a map of Amsterdam and its gum litter to raise awareness.

Sadly, it doesn’t seem for sale anymore and putting your feet in chewing gum might feel slightly awkward.It does create some food for thought (pun intended) on what’s in store for the future of fashion. Who knows what edible textiles will be released in a few years from now?

Shop our conscious edit:

Conscious fashion essentials: vegan leather

Conscious beauty: vegan

Gum [gŭm] - A sticky substance that’s going full-circle, into your shoes.

Just for the fun of it, we’re steering away from the fruits and vegetables here. Do you know that feeling when you’re just dwelling around in a big city, and suddenly a sticky piece of gum won’t let go of your shoes? Back in 2018, Gumdrop decided to take the chewing gum to your feet with its Gum-tec Gumshoe, in collaboration with iAmsterdam. The sole is made of gum litter, and even displays a map of Amsterdam and its gum litter to raise awareness.

Sadly, it doesn’t seem for sale anymore and putting your feet in chewing gum might feel slightly awkward.It does create some food for thought (pun intended) on what’s in store for the future of fashion. Who knows what edible textiles will be released in a few years from now?

Shop our conscious edit:

Conscious fashion essentials: vegan leather

Conscious beauty: vegan

Food for Fashion: a Flavoursome Curation

Words: Cynthia Ko

The future of fashion is looking incredibly flavoursome as entrepreneurs from all over the world turn to food and organic materials for inspiration. We’re not talking about meat dresses here, but elegant solutions that make use of materials we often take for granted.

Admittedly, the best way forward in fashion is still to re-use what we already own as long as possible (see: Revolutionising Fashion: a New Way of Producing and Consuming), but if all else fails, turning food waste into something wearable will bring some sustainable spice into your wardrobe. Today’s menuoffers you a wide range of options.

Food for Fashion: a Flavoursome Curation

Words: Cynthia Ko

The future of fashion is looking incredibly flavoursome as entrepreneurs from all over the world turn to food and organic materials for inspiration. We’re not talking about meat dresses here, but elegant solutions that make use of materials we often take for granted.

Admittedly, the best way forward in fashion is still to re-use what we already own as long as possible (see: Revolutionising Fashion: a New Way of Producing and Consuming), but if all else fails, turning food waste into something wearable will bring some sustainable spice into your wardrobe. Today’s menuoffers you a wide range of options.

Food for Fashion: a Flavoursome Curation

Words: Cynthia Ko

The future of fashion is looking incredibly flavoursome as entrepreneurs from all over the world turn to food and organic materials for inspiration. We’re not talking about meat dresses here, but elegant solutions that make use of materials we often take for granted.

Admittedly, the best way forward in fashion is still to re-use what we already own as long as possible (see: Revolutionising Fashion: a New Way of Producing and Consuming), but if all else fails, turning food waste into something wearable will bring some sustainable spice into your wardrobe. Today’s menuoffers you a wide range of options.

Food for Fashion: a Flavoursome Curation

Words: Cynthia Ko

The future of fashion is looking incredibly flavoursome as entrepreneurs from all over the world turn to food and organic materials for inspiration. We’re not talking about meat dresses here, but elegant solutions that make use of materials we often take for granted.

Admittedly, the best way forward in fashion is still to re-use what we already own as long as possible (see: Revolutionising Fashion: a New Way of Producing and Consuming), but if all else fails, turning food waste into something wearable will bring some sustainable spice into your wardrobe. Today’s menuoffers you a wide range of options.

Aicha

Domen & Van de Velde


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