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Alexandre Gaudin

An interview with photographer Alexandre Gaudin about life, the pandemic, photography and black culture

First off, what is your current mood? How are you feeling at the moment?

"Actually I’m fine. Fashion week is done I can take some time for myself now."

We’re living in a post pandemic world. In your ideal vision, what does the post pandemic world look like next year?

"I hope that all the borders will be open without quarantine specially in Asia, I would like to travel freely as before the pandemic."

If you could travel in time, would you travel forward or backward? To what time would you travel and why?

"Everything does not happen by chance. I would not change a thing and I would rather move forward because good things also happened during the pandemic."

An interview with photographer Alexandre Gaudin about life, the pandemic, photography and black culture

What in your opinion makes a good photographer and photograph?

"It's complicated to say, but I would say that a good photographer must have his style and must constantly diversify and get out of his comfort zone."

You have a background in graphic design and visual merchandising. How does this influence you as a photographer and how does it show in your works?

"Having a background in graphic design helps me in my composition. I visualise how I want to shoot and put the scene together. I realise today that this has almost become an automatism for me now."

How do you approach each series you create? What does the process look like?

"it's always different, I listen to the clients and add my personal touch."

An interview with photographer Alexandre Gaudin about life, the pandemic, photography and black culture

We are in love with the series you created for Botter’s AW21 campaign. Can you tell us about the series? What was the concept and how did it start?

"The series was shot for a jewelry and accessories campaign. Rushemy Botter and Lisi Herrebrugh are very talented and I hold them in high regard. They wanted to do a series based on an image I captured during their first show as creative directors of Nina Ricci. Everything started from there."

We love how the series celebrates and heralds blackness and black beauty. How important is this theme to you?

"It’s an important theme to Rushemy and Lisi and me as well. I’m Congolese-French so being able to push the community forward in a campaign like this is a pleasure and honor to me. I haven’t had the chance to go to Black Africa yet but I hope to be able to soon."

An interview with photographer Alexandre Gaudin about life, the pandemic, photography and black culture

What is your ethnic background? And how do you incorporate personal and cultural elements in your works?

"I am half French and Congolese, I haven't had the chance to go to Black Africa yet but I hope soon! I am very inspired by Asia because I already go there a lot. "

What message do you ultimately want to convey in your works?

"I don't have any messages, well I don't think about that when I work, I would say that I like diversity and I like sharing whether it is between photographer or in life in general."

We live in a world of barriers — of rules, hierarchy, traditions. What barrier(s) do you wish to break personally or in your work?

"I don’t like being confined to barriers and rules, especially in photography. In France, autodidacts aren’t necessarily recognized because people tend to put you in boxes. I did not study photography. Everything I’m doing now is through learning by doing and creating my own rules. And I very much like it that way."

An interview with photographer Alexandre Gaudin about life, the pandemic, photography and black culture

If there’s one thing you can change in the world, what would it be?

"Racism"

What message do you have for bicultural artists who are starting in the creative field?

"Work and don't listen to people who discourage you."

An interview with photographer Alexandre Gaudin about life, the pandemic, photography and black culture
An interview with photographer Alexandre Gaudin about life, the pandemic, photography and black culture
An interview with photographer Alexandre Gaudin about life, the pandemic, photography and black culture
An interview with photographer Alexandre Gaudin about life, the pandemic, photography and black culture

Alexandre Gaudin

An interview with photographer Alexandre Gaudin about life, the pandemic, photography and black culture

First off, what is your current mood? How are you feeling at the moment?

"Actually I’m fine. Fashion week is done I can take some time for myself now."

We’re living in a post pandemic world. In your ideal vision, what does the post pandemic world look like next year?

"I hope that all the borders will be open without quarantine specially in Asia, I would like to travel freely as before the pandemic."

If you could travel in time, would you travel forward or backward? To what time would you travel and why?

"Everything does not happen by chance. I would not change a thing and I would rather move forward because good things also happened during the pandemic."

An interview with photographer Alexandre Gaudin about life, the pandemic, photography and black culture

What in your opinion makes a good photographer and photograph?

"It's complicated to say, but I would say that a good photographer must have his style and must constantly diversify and get out of his comfort zone."

You have a background in graphic design and visual merchandising. How does this influence you as a photographer and how does it show in your works?

"Having a background in graphic design helps me in my composition. I visualise how I want to shoot and put the scene together. I realise today that this has almost become an automatism for me now."

How do you approach each series you create? What does the process look like?

"it's always different, I listen to the clients and add my personal touch."

An interview with photographer Alexandre Gaudin about life, the pandemic, photography and black culture

We are in love with the series you created for Botter’s AW21 campaign. Can you tell us about the series? What was the concept and how did it start?

"The series was shot for a jewelry and accessories campaign. Rushemy Botter and Lisi Herrebrugh are very talented and I hold them in high regard. They wanted to do a series based on an image I captured during their first show as creative directors of Nina Ricci. Everything started from there."

We love how the series celebrates and heralds blackness and black beauty. How important is this theme to you?

"It’s an important theme to Rushemy and Lisi and me as well. I’m Congolese-French so being able to push the community forward in a campaign like this is a pleasure and honor to me. I haven’t had the chance to go to Black Africa yet but I hope to be able to soon."

An interview with photographer Alexandre Gaudin about life, the pandemic, photography and black culture

What is your ethnic background? And how do you incorporate personal and cultural elements in your works?

"I am half French and Congolese, I haven't had the chance to go to Black Africa yet but I hope soon! I am very inspired by Asia because I already go there a lot. "

What message do you ultimately want to convey in your works?

"I don't have any messages, well I don't think about that when I work, I would say that I like diversity and I like sharing whether it is between photographer or in life in general."

We live in a world of barriers — of rules, hierarchy, traditions. What barrier(s) do you wish to break personally or in your work?

"I don’t like being confined to barriers and rules, especially in photography. In France, autodidacts aren’t necessarily recognized because people tend to put you in boxes. I did not study photography. Everything I’m doing now is through learning by doing and creating my own rules. And I very much like it that way."

An interview with photographer Alexandre Gaudin about life, the pandemic, photography and black culture

If there’s one thing you can change in the world, what would it be?

"Racism"

What message do you have for bicultural artists who are starting in the creative field?

"Work and don't listen to people who discourage you."

An interview with photographer Alexandre Gaudin about life, the pandemic, photography and black culture
An interview with photographer Alexandre Gaudin about life, the pandemic, photography and black culture
An interview with photographer Alexandre Gaudin about life, the pandemic, photography and black culture
An interview with photographer Alexandre Gaudin about life, the pandemic, photography and black culture

An interview with: Alexandre Gaudin

Alexandre Gaudin

First off, what is your current mood? How are you feeling at the moment?

"Actually I’m fine. Fashion week is done I can take some time for myself now."

We’re living in a post pandemic world. In your ideal vision, what does the post pandemic world look like next year?

"I hope that all the borders will be open without quarantine specially in Asia, I would like to travel freely as before the pandemic."

If you could travel in time, would you travel forward or backward? To what time would you travel and why?

"Everything does not happen by chance. I would not change a thing and I would rather move forward because good things also happened during the pandemic."

What in your opinion makes a good photographer and photograph?

"It's complicated to say, but I would say that a good photographer must have his style and must constantly diversify and get out of his comfort zone."

You have a background in graphic design and visual merchandising. How does this influence you as a photographer and how does it show in your works?

"Having a background in graphic design helps me in my composition. I visualise how I want to shoot and put the scene together. I realise today that this has almost become an automatism for me now."

How do you approach each series you create? What does the process look like?

"it's always different, I listen to the clients and add my personal touch."

We are in love with the series you created for Botter’s AW21 campaign. Can you tell us about the series? What was the concept and how did it start?

"The series was shot for a jewelry and accessories campaign. Rushemy Botter and Lisi Herrebrugh are very talented and I hold them in high regard. They wanted to do a series based on an image I captured during their first show as creative directors of Nina Ricci. Everything started from there."

We love how the series celebrates and heralds blackness and black beauty. How important is this theme to you?

"It’s an important theme to Rushemy and Lisi and me as well. I’m Congolese-French so being able to push the community forward in a campaign like this is a pleasure and honor to me. I haven’t had the chance to go to Black Africa yet but I hope to be able to soon."

What is your ethnic background? And how do you incorporate personal and cultural elements in your works?

"I am half French and Congolese, I haven't had the chance to go to Black Africa yet but I hope soon! I am very inspired by Asia because I already go there a lot. "

What message do you ultimately want to convey in your works?

"I don't have any messages, well I don't think about that when I work, I would say that I like diversity and I like sharing whether it is between photographer or in life in general."

We live in a world of barriers — of rules, hierarchy, traditions. What barrier(s) do you wish to break personally or in your work?

"I don’t like being confined to barriers and rules, especially in photography. In France, autodidacts aren’t necessarily recognized because people tend to put you in boxes. I did not study photography. Everything I’m doing now is through learning by doing and creating my own rules. And I very much like it that way."

If there’s one thing you can change in the world, what would it be?

"Racism"

What message do you have for bicultural artists who are starting in the creative field?

"Work and don't listen to people who discourage you."

Alexandre Gaudin

First off, what is your current mood? How are you feeling at the moment?

"Actually I’m fine. Fashion week is done I can take some time for myself now."

We’re living in a post pandemic world. In your ideal vision, what does the post pandemic world look like next year?

"I hope that all the borders will be open without quarantine specially in Asia, I would like to travel freely as before the pandemic."

If you could travel in time, would you travel forward or backward? To what time would you travel and why?

"Everything does not happen by chance. I would not change a thing and I would rather move forward because good things also happened during the pandemic."

What is your ethnic background? And how do you incorporate personal and cultural elements in your works?

"I am half French and Congolese, I haven't had the chance to go to Black Africa yet but I hope soon! I am very inspired by Asia because I already go there a lot. "

What message do you ultimately want to convey in your works?

"I don't have any messages, well I don't think about that when I work, I would say that I like diversity and I like sharing whether it is between photographer or in life in general."

We live in a world of barriers — of rules, hierarchy, traditions. What barrier(s) do you wish to break personally or in your work?

"I don’t like being confined to barriers and rules, especially in photography. In France, autodidacts aren’t necessarily recognized because people tend to put you in boxes. I did not study photography. Everything I’m doing now is through learning by doing and creating my own rules. And I very much like it that way."

What in your opinion makes a good photographer and photograph?

"It's complicated to say, but I would say that a good photographer must have his style and must constantly diversify and get out of his comfort zone."

You have a background in graphic design and visual merchandising. How does this influence you as a photographer and how does it show in your works?

"Having a background in graphic design helps me in my composition. I visualise how I want to shoot and put the scene together. I realise today that this has almost become an automatism for me now."

How do you approach each series you create? What does the process look like?

"it's always different, I listen to the clients and add my personal touch."

If there’s one thing you can change in the world, what would it be?

"Racism"

What message do you have for bicultural artists who are starting in the creative field?

"Work and don't listen to people who discourage you."

We are in love with the series you created for Botter’s AW21 campaign. Can you tell us about the series? What was the concept and how did it start?

"The series was shot for a jewelry and accessories campaign. Rushemy Botter and Lisi Herrebrugh are very talented and I hold them in high regard. They wanted to do a series based on an image I captured during their first show as creative directors of Nina Ricci. Everything started from there."

We love how the series celebrates and heralds blackness and black beauty. How important is this theme to you?

"It’s an important theme to Rushemy and Lisi and me as well. I’m Congolese-French so being able to push the community forward in a campaign like this is a pleasure and honor to me. I haven’t had the chance to go to Black Africa yet but I hope to be able to soon."

An interview with: Alexandre Gaudin

Alexandre Gaudin

First off, what is your current mood? How are you feeling at the moment?

"Actually I’m fine. Fashion week is done I can take some time for myself now."

We’re living in a post pandemic world. In your ideal vision, what does the post pandemic world look like next year?

"I hope that all the borders will be open without quarantine specially in Asia, I would like to travel freely as before the pandemic."

If you could travel in time, would you travel forward or backward? To what time would you travel and why?

"Everything does not happen by chance. I would not change a thing and I would rather move forward because good things also happened during the pandemic."

What in your opinion makes a good photographer and photograph?

"It's complicated to say, but I would say that a good photographer must have his style and must constantly diversify and get out of his comfort zone."

You have a background in graphic design and visual merchandising. How does this influence you as a photographer and how does it show in your works?

"Having a background in graphic design helps me in my composition. I visualise how I want to shoot and put the scene together. I realise today that this has almost become an automatism for me now."

How do you approach each series you create? What does the process look like?

"it's always different, I listen to the clients and add my personal touch."

We are in love with the series you created for Botter’s AW21 campaign. Can you tell us about the series? What was the concept and how did it start?

"The series was shot for a jewelry and accessories campaign. Rushemy Botter and Lisi Herrebrugh are very talented and I hold them in high regard. They wanted to do a series based on an image I captured during their first show as creative directors of Nina Ricci. Everything started from there."

We love how the series celebrates and heralds blackness and black beauty. How important is this theme to you?

"It’s an important theme to Rushemy and Lisi and me as well. I’m Congolese-French so being able to push the community forward in a campaign like this is a pleasure and honor to me. I haven’t had the chance to go to Black Africa yet but I hope to be able to soon."

What is your ethnic background? And how do you incorporate personal and cultural elements in your works?

"I am half French and Congolese, I haven't had the chance to go to Black Africa yet but I hope soon! I am very inspired by Asia because I already go there a lot. "

What message do you ultimately want to convey in your works?

"I don't have any messages, well I don't think about that when I work, I would say that I like diversity and I like sharing whether it is between photographer or in life in general."

We live in a world of barriers — of rules, hierarchy, traditions. What barrier(s) do you wish to break personally or in your work?

"I don’t like being confined to barriers and rules, especially in photography. In France, autodidacts aren’t necessarily recognized because people tend to put you in boxes. I did not study photography. Everything I’m doing now is through learning by doing and creating my own rules. And I very much like it that way."

If there’s one thing you can change in the world, what would it be?

"Racism"

What message do you have for bicultural artists who are starting in the creative field?

"Work and don't listen to people who discourage you."

An interview with: Alexandre Gaudin

Alexandre Gaudin

First off, what is your current mood? How are you feeling at the moment?

"Actually I’m fine. Fashion week is done I can take some time for myself now."

We’re living in a post pandemic world. In your ideal vision, what does the post pandemic world look like next year?

"I hope that all the borders will be open without quarantine specially in Asia, I would like to travel freely as before the pandemic."

If you could travel in time, would you travel forward or backward? To what time would you travel and why?

"Everything does not happen by chance. I would not change a thing and I would rather move forward because good things also happened during the pandemic."

What in your opinion makes a good photographer and photograph?

"It's complicated to say, but I would say that a good photographer must have his style and must constantly diversify and get out of his comfort zone."

You have a background in graphic design and visual merchandising. How does this influence you as a photographer and how does it show in your works?

"Having a background in graphic design helps me in my composition. I visualise how I want to shoot and put the scene together. I realise today that this has almost become an automatism for me now."

How do you approach each series you create? What does the process look like?

"it's always different, I listen to the clients and add my personal touch."

We are in love with the series you created for Botter’s AW21 campaign. Can you tell us about the series? What was the concept and how did it start?

"The series was shot for a jewelry and accessories campaign. Rushemy Botter and Lisi Herrebrugh are very talented and I hold them in high regard. They wanted to do a series based on an image I captured during their first show as creative directors of Nina Ricci. Everything started from there."

We love how the series celebrates and heralds blackness and black beauty. How important is this theme to you?

"It’s an important theme to Rushemy and Lisi and me as well. I’m Congolese-French so being able to push the community forward in a campaign like this is a pleasure and honor to me. I haven’t had the chance to go to Black Africa yet but I hope to be able to soon."

What is your ethnic background? And how do you incorporate personal and cultural elements in your works?

"I am half French and Congolese, I haven't had the chance to go to Black Africa yet but I hope soon! I am very inspired by Asia because I already go there a lot. "

What message do you ultimately want to convey in your works?

"I don't have any messages, well I don't think about that when I work, I would say that I like diversity and I like sharing whether it is between photographer or in life in general."

We live in a world of barriers — of rules, hierarchy, traditions. What barrier(s) do you wish to break personally or in your work?

"I don’t like being confined to barriers and rules, especially in photography. In France, autodidacts aren’t necessarily recognized because people tend to put you in boxes. I did not study photography. Everything I’m doing now is through learning by doing and creating my own rules. And I very much like it that way."

If there’s one thing you can change in the world, what would it be?

"Racism"

What message do you have for bicultural artists who are starting in the creative field?

"Work and don't listen to people who discourage you."

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An interview with photographer Alexandre Gaudin about life, the pandemic, photography and black culture

An interview with: Alexandre Gaudin

Alexandre Gaudin

An interview with photographer Alexandre Gaudin about life, the pandemic, photography and black culture

First off, what is your current mood? How are you feeling at the moment?

"Actually I’m fine. Fashion week is done I can take some time for myself now."

We’re living in a post pandemic world. In your ideal vision, what does the post pandemic world look like next year?

"I hope that all the borders will be open without quarantine specially in Asia, I would like to travel freely as before the pandemic."

If you could travel in time, would you travel forward or backward? To what time would you travel and why?

"Everything does not happen by chance. I would not change a thing and I would rather move forward because good things also happened during the pandemic."

An interview with photographer Alexandre Gaudin about life, the pandemic, photography and black culture

What in your opinion makes a good photographer and photograph?

"It's complicated to say, but I would say that a good photographer must have his style and must constantly diversify and get out of his comfort zone."

You have a background in graphic design and visual merchandising. How does this influence you as a photographer and how does it show in your works?

"Having a background in graphic design helps me in my composition. I visualise how I want to shoot and put the scene together. I realise today that this has almost become an automatism for me now."

How do you approach each series you create? What does the process look like?

"it's always different, I listen to the clients and add my personal touch."

An interview with photographer Alexandre Gaudin about life, the pandemic, photography and black culture

We are in love with the series you created for Botter’s AW21 campaign. Can you tell us about the series? What was the concept and how did it start?

"The series was shot for a jewelry and accessories campaign. Rushemy Botter and Lisi Herrebrugh are very talented and I hold them in high regard. They wanted to do a series based on an image I captured during their first show as creative directors of Nina Ricci. Everything started from there."

We love how the series celebrates and heralds blackness and black beauty. How important is this theme to you?

"It’s an important theme to Rushemy and Lisi and me as well. I’m Congolese-French so being able to push the community forward in a campaign like this is a pleasure and honor to me. I haven’t had the chance to go to Black Africa yet but I hope to be able to soon."

An interview with photographer Alexandre Gaudin about life, the pandemic, photography and black culture

What is your ethnic background? And how do you incorporate personal and cultural elements in your works?

"I am half French and Congolese, I haven't had the chance to go to Black Africa yet but I hope soon! I am very inspired by Asia because I already go there a lot. "

What message do you ultimately want to convey in your works?

"I don't have any messages, well I don't think about that when I work, I would say that I like diversity and I like sharing whether it is between photographer or in life in general."

We live in a world of barriers — of rules, hierarchy, traditions. What barrier(s) do you wish to break personally or in your work?

"I don’t like being confined to barriers and rules, especially in photography. In France, autodidacts aren’t necessarily recognized because people tend to put you in boxes. I did not study photography. Everything I’m doing now is through learning by doing and creating my own rules. And I very much like it that way."

An interview with photographer Alexandre Gaudin about life, the pandemic, photography and black culture

If there’s one thing you can change in the world, what would it be?

"Racism"

What message do you have for bicultural artists who are starting in the creative field?

"Work and don't listen to people who discourage you."

An interview with photographer Alexandre Gaudin about life, the pandemic, photography and black culture
An interview with photographer Alexandre Gaudin about life, the pandemic, photography and black culture
An interview with photographer Alexandre Gaudin about life, the pandemic, photography and black culture
An interview with photographer Alexandre Gaudin about life, the pandemic, photography and black culture
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